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    Default Management of Keratoconus Course videos

    Keratoconus is a non-inflammatory, progressive thinning process of the cornea. It is a relatively common disorder of unknown etiology that can involve each layer of the cornea and often leads to high myopia and astigmatism. Computer- assisted corneal topography devices are valuable diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of subclinical keratoconus and for tracking the progression of the disease. The traditional conservative management of keratoconus begins with spectacle correction and contact lenses. Several newer, more invasive, treatments are currently available, especially for contact lens-intolerant patients. Intrastromal corneal ring segments can be used to reshape the abnormal cornea to improve the topographic abnormalities and visual acuity. Phakic intraocular lenses such as iris-fixated, angle-supported, posterior chamber implantable collamer and toric lenses are additional valuable options for the correction of refractive error. Corneal cross-linking is a relatively new method of stiffening the cornea to halt the progression of the disease. The future management of keratoconus will most likely incorporate multiple treatment modalities, both simultaneous and sequential, for the prevention and treatment of this disease.
    Management Keratoconus Course videos attachment.php?attachmentid=433&stc=1&d=1436707910

    Signs and symptoms
    A simulation of the multiple images seen by a person with keratoconus.
    "... a candle, when looked at, appears like a number of lights, confusedly running into one another" — Nottingham
    People with early keratoconus typically notice a minor blurring of their vision and come to their clinician seeking corrective lenses for reading or driving. At early stages, the symptoms of keratoconus may be no different from those of any other refractive defect of the eye. As the disease progresses, vision deteriorates, sometimes rapidly. Visual acuity becomes impaired at all distances, and night vision is often poor. Some individuals have vision in one eye that is markedly worse than that in the other. The disease is often bilateral, though asymmetrical. Some develop photophobia (sensitivity to bright light), eye strain from squinting in order to read, or itching in the eye,but there is normally little or no sensation of pain. It may cause luminous objects to appear as cylindrical pipes with the same intensity at all points.

    The classic symptom of keratoconus is the perception of multiple "ghost" images, known as monocular polyopia. This effect is most clearly seen with a high contrast field, such as a point of light on a dark background. Instead of seeing just one point, a person with keratoconus sees many images of the point, spread out in a chaotic pattern. This pattern does not typically change from day to day, but over time, it often takes on new forms. Patients also commonly notice streaking and flaring distortion around light sources. Some even notice the images moving relative to one another in time with their heart beat. The predominant optical aberration of the eye in keratoconus is the so-called coma. The visual distortion experienced by the patient comes from two sources, one being the irregular deformation of the surface of the cornea, and the other being scarring that occurs on its exposed highpoints. These factors act to form regions on the cornea that map an image to different locations on the retina. The effect can worsen in low light conditions, as the dark-adapted pupil dilates to expose more of the irregular surface of the cornea.

    Management of Keratoconus Course videos By Mazen Sinjab,MD,PHD


    Management of Keratoconus Part 1 video
    Management of Keratoconus Part 2 video
    Management of Keratoconus Part 3 video
    Quick Guide to the Management of Keratoconus Part 4 video
    Quick Guide to the Management of Keratoconus Part 5 video
    Management of Keratoconus Part 6 video
    Management of Keratoconus Part 7 video
    References:
    http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1194693-overview
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keratoconus











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