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Thread: Cellulitis of Leg picture - Pediatric Atlas

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    Default Cellulitis of Leg picture - Pediatric Atlas

    What is Cellulitis?
    Cellulitis is a common bacterial skin infection. Cellulitis may first appear as a red, swollen area that feels hot and tender to the touch. The redness and swelling often spread rapidly. Cellulitis is usually painful.

    Treating Cellulitis
    Your doctor will usually prescribe a two-week regimen of oral antibiotics to treat cellulitis. Even if symptoms improve within a few days, it’s important to take all of the medication prescribed to ensure proper treatment. While taking antibiotics, monitor your condition to see if symptoms improve. In most cases, symptoms will improve or disappear within a few days. In some cases, pain relievers are prescribed. You should rest until your symptoms improve. While you rest, you should raise the affected limb higher than your heart to reduce any swelling.

    If you don’t respond to treatment within three days after beginning a round of antibiotics, if your symptoms get worse, or if you develop a fever, contact your doctor immediately.

    Cellulitis Causes and Risk Factors
    Cellulitis occurs when certain types of bacteria enter through a cut or crack in the skin. Cellulitis is commonly caused by staphylococcus and streptococcus bacteria

    Treating Cellulitis
    Your doctor will usually prescribe a two-week regimen of oral antibiotics to treat cellulitis. Even if symptoms improve within a few days, it’s important to take all of the medication prescribed to ensure proper treatment. While taking antibiotics, monitor your condition to see if symptoms improve. In most cases, symptoms will improve or disappear within a few days. In some cases, pain relievers are prescribed. You should rest until your symptoms improve. While you rest, you should raise the affected limb higher than your heart to reduce any swelling.

    Antibiotics
    If you are well enough to be treated at home, you will be given a course of antibiotic tablets.
    The length of the course will depend on your circumstances, including how quickly you respond to treatment and whether you have any underlying conditions such as lymphoedema.
    The most commonly prescribed antibiotic for cellulitis is flucloxacillin, which is part of the penicillin group of antibiotics.
    The most common side effects of flucloxacillin are mild digestive problems, such as an upset stomach or episodes of diarrhoea.
    If you cannot take flucloxacillin because you're allergic to penicillin, alternative antibiotics such as erythromycin or clarithromycin can be used.
    If it's suspected that your cellulitis was caused by a wound being exposed to contaminated water, you will be given a combination of two different antibiotics. This is usually doxycycline or ciprofloxacin in combination with flucloxacillin or erythromycin.
    When you first start taking the antibiotics, you may notice that your skin becomes redder. This is usually only a temporary reaction, and the redness should start to fade within 48 hours.
    Contact your GP immediately if your symptoms get worse 48 hours after taking the antibiotics, or you develop additional symptoms, such as a high temperature or vomiting.
    Cellulitis picture Pediatric Atlas attachment.php?s=793e652919d480e8b961b95024abf019&attachmentid=1753&d=1441139973

    Self-care
    There are steps you can take at home to ease your symptoms and speed your recovery from cellulitis.
    Drink plenty of fluids to avoid dehydration.
    If your leg is affected by cellulitis, keep it raised whilst you are resting, using pillows or a chair. This should make you feel more comfortable and help to reduce the swelling. If possible, the foot should be raised higher than the hip. If your arm is affected, try and keep your lower arm raised above your elbow.

    Treatment at hospital
    If you need to be admitted to hospital for treatment, you will be given antibiotics directly into your vein through an injection or a drip (known as intravenous antibiotics).
    Once you have recovered from the initial symptoms you can usually be treated with antibiotics at home or as an outpatient, rather than staying in hospital.

    Antibiotics
    If you are well enough to be treated at home, you will be given a course of antibiotic tablets.
    The length of the course will depend on your circumstances, including how quickly you respond to treatment and whether you have any underlying conditions such as lymphoedema.
    The most commonly prescribed antibiotic for cellulitis is flucloxacillin, which is part of the penicillin group of antibiotics.
    The most common side effects of flucloxacillin are mild digestive problems, such as an upset stomach or episodes of diarrhoea.
    If you cannot take flucloxacillin because you're allergic to penicillin, alternative antibiotics such as erythromycin or clarithromycin can be used.
    If it's suspected that your cellulitis was caused by a wound being exposed to contaminated water, you will be given a combination of two different antibiotics. This is usually doxycycline or ciprofloxacin in combination with flucloxacillin or erythromycin.
    When you first start taking the antibiotics, you may notice that your skin becomes redder. This is usually only a temporary reaction, and the redness should start to fade within 48 hours.
    Contact your GP immediately if your symptoms get worse 48 hours after taking the antibiotics, or you develop additional symptoms, such as a high temperature or vomiting.

    Treatment at hospital
    If you need to be admitted to hospital for treatment, you will be given antibiotics directly into your vein through an injection or a drip (known as intravenous antibiotics).
    Once you have recovered from the initial symptoms you can usually be treated with antibiotics at home or as an outpatient, rather than staying in hospital.

    References:
    Cellulitis - Treatment - NHS Choices
    Cellulitis: Causes, Symptoms, Treatments Pictures











    Last edited by Medical Photos; 09-01-2015 at 08:39 PM.

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