Vertigo /ˈvɜrtɨɡoʊ/ (from the Latin vertō "a whirling or spinning movement") is a subtype of dizziness in which a patient inappropriately experiences the perception of motion (usually a spinning motion) due to dysfunction of the vestibular system. It is often associated with nausea and vomiting as well as a balance disorder, causing difficulties standing or walking. There are three types of vertigo. The first is known as objective and describes when the patient has the sensation that objects in the environment are moving; the second is known as subjective and refers to when the patient feels as if he or she is moving, and the third is known as pseudovertigo, an intensive sensation of rotation inside the patient's head. While appearing in textbooks, this classification has little to do with the pathophysiology or treatment of vertigo.

USMLE Step 3 algorithm of vertigo and how to differentiate between pre-syncope and vertigo, and hwo to distinguish between peripheral vertigo, and central vertigo as well as the different types of peripheral vertigo. ALL IN 5 minutes!