Over the past five years CCIA has grown significantly from a staff of barely 50, nearly tripling in size, with a vision to cure childhood cancer through world class medical research. The Institute has maintained a remarkable trajectory of growth and development over the last five years and is now the largest children's cancer research facility in the country.

CCIA is the only independent medical research institute in Australia devoted solely to research into the causes, prevention, better treatment and cure of childhood cancer.

Childhood cancer is the most common cause of death from disease in children. Currently, of all children diagnosed with cancer, three in every ten will die. Childhood cancer ranks second only to breast cancer in terms of person years of life saved through medical research.

"Though statistically childhood cancer accounts for only one percent of all malignancies, when you look at the enormous impact it has on the Australian community, as well as the individuals directly involved, it is vital that we invest more into saving our children," Professor Michelle Haber AM, Executive Director of CCIA said.

"This commitment of $15 million from the NSW Government is a wonderful addition to its previous grant of $3.3 million and also to previous substantial Federal Government and community support. This means that the vision of a cure for childhood cancer through medical research is one step closer to being a reality. The building program will now be able to commence as early as August this year.

CCIA has already produced significant advances in the understanding and treatment of childhood cancers including the first paediatric trial in Australia that uses genetic testing to tailor chemotherapy regimes for children being treated with leukaemia.

"This method of taking discovery at the laboratory bench to the bedside in a rapid manner is an important principle for us as we know that the cure rates and care improvements we have seen over the last three decades have come about from this approach", Professor Michelle Haber AM, said.

The Institute's new building will be built at the University of New South Wales as the first stage of a planned multi-stage development of the University's biomedical campus that will accommodate the Institute's projected growth to a total of 500 staff over time.

The new building with its outstanding facilities and infrastructure will enhance CCIA's ability to closely integrate with other outstanding cancer researchers and also with the clinical care of paediatric oncology patients at the adjacent Sydney Children's Hospital.

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Contact: Miriam Pollak
Research Australia