Scientists Reverse Mental Retardation Mice transpixel.gif

In a case of life imitating art, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) reported yesterday that they had successfully reversed mental retardation in mice, just as scientists did in the classic 1966 novel Flowers for Algernon. In the book by Daniel Keyes, scientists use experimental surgery - first tested on a mouse named Algernon - to dramatically boost the intelligence of a mentally retarded janitor named Charlie Gordon. Now M.I.T. scientists report in Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences USA that they ameliorated brain damage in mice caused by a genetic disorder known as fragile X syndrome by blocking an enzyme involved in cellular development.

Fragile X affects one in 4,000 boys and one in 6,000 girls. It is caused by a mutation in the fragile x mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1) - located on the X sex chromosome - that results in the loss of the fragile x mental retardation protein (FMRP). The resulting illness is characterized by hyperactivity, attention deficit, repetitive behavior, anxiety and cognitive difficulties ranging from learning disability to mental retardation.

"Finding could set the stage for ways to reverse damage in sufferers of the inherited fragile X syndrome"
By Nikhil Swaminathan
Scientific American
Link to article

http://www.sciam.com