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    Default Calciphylaxis pictures - Atlas of Skin Diseases

    Calciphylaxis, or calcific uremic arteriolopathy , is a syndrome of vascular calcification, thrombosis and skin necrosis. It is seen almost exclusively in patients with Stage 5 chronic kidney disease. It results in chronic non-healing wounds and is usually fatal. Calciphylaxis is a rare but serious disease.

    Calciphylaxis is one type of extraskeletal calcification. Similar extraskeletal calcifications are observed in some patients with hypercalcemic states, including patients with milk-alkali syndrome, sarcoidosis, primary hyperparathyroidism, and hypervitaminosis D.

    Calciphylaxis pictures


    Calciphylaxis pictures Atlas Skin Diseases attachment.php?attachmentid=402&stc=1&d=1436468779

    Calciphylaxis pictures Atlas Skin Diseases attachment.php?attachmentid=403&stc=1&d=1436468789

    Early lesions of calciphylaxis manifest as nonspecific violaceous mottling; as livedo reticularis; or as erythematous papules, plaques, or nodules. More developed lesions have a stellate purpuric configuration with central cutaneous necrosis

    Multiple lesions of variable age may be present, following the path of the vasculature. Less commonly, lesions may manifest as either bullae or distinct subcutaneous, erythematous nodules suggestive of erythema nodosum. Lesions are excruciatingly tender and extremely firm.

    The distribution of the lesions may be characterized as proximal or distal. Ninety percent of lesions of calciphylaxis occur on the lower extremities. Distal lesions are those that occur below the knee; proximal lesions occur on the thighs or the trunk. Proximally distributed lesions occur in 44-68% of patients, with lesions developing predominantly on the thighs, the buttocks, and the lower part of the abdomen. Distal and visceral involvement are not uncommon.

    An intact peripheral pulse helps to distinguish acral calciphylaxis from atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease. Ulceration is considered a late finding and is associated with a higher mortality rate.

    Diagnosis
    There is no diagnostic test for calciphylaxis. The diagnosis is a clinical one. The characteristic lesions are the ischemic skin lesions (usually with areas of skin necrosis). The necrotic skin lesions (i.e. the dying or already dead skin areas) typically appear as violaceous (dark bluish purple) lesions and/or completely black leathery lesions. They can be extensive. The suspected diagnosis can be supported by a skin biopsy. It shows arterial calcification and occlusion in the absence of vasculitis. Sometimes the bone scintigraphy can show increased tracer accumulation in the soft tissues. In certain patients, anti-nuclear antibody may play a role.

    Treatment
    The optimal treatment is prevention. Rigorous and continuous control of phosphate and calcium balance most probably will avoid the metabolic changes which may lead to calciphylaxis.

    There is no specific treatment. Of the treatments that exist, none is internationally recognised as the standard of care. An acceptable treatment could include:

    • Dialysis (the number of sessions may be increased)
    • Intensive wound care
    • Clot-dissolving agents (tissue plasminogen activator)
    • Hyperbaric oxygen[4]
    • Maggot larval debridement
    • Adequate pain control
    • Correction of the underlying plasma calcium and phosphorus abnormalities (lowering the Ca x P product below 55 mg2/dL2)
    • Sodium thiosulfate
    • Avoiding (further) local tissue trauma (including avoiding all subcutaneous injections, and all not-absolutely-necessary infusions and transfusions)
    • Urgent parathyroidectomy: The efficacy of this measure remains uncertain although calciphylaxis is associated with frank hyperparathyroidism. Urgent parathyroidectomy may benefit those patients who have uncontrollable plasma calcium and phosphorus concentrations despite dialysis. Also, cinacalcet can be used and may serve as an alternative to parathyroidectomy. The trade name of cinacalcet is Sensipar or Mimpara.
    • Patients who receive kidney transplants also receive immunosuppression. Considering lowering the dose of or discontinuing the use of immunosuppressive drugs in renal transplant patients who continue to have persistent or progressive calciphylactic skin lesions can contribute to an acceptable treatment of calciphylaxis.


    References:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calciphylaxis
    http://emedicine.medscape.com/articl...81-clinical#b4







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