Results 1 to 1 of 1
  1. #1

    Default Baboon syndrome pictures - Atlas of Skin Diseases

    The condition is usually caused by an allergic reaction to penicillin drugs, but can also be caused by exposure to mercury or nickel, said Dr. Andreas Bircher, a dermatologist at University Hospital of Basel in Switzerland. (He was not involved in the study but has reported other cases of baboon syndrome.)

    In the present case, during the man's initial examination, he had enlarged and inflamed tonsils, according to the physicians at the NHS Lothian hospital in the United Kingdom who reported the case. His regular doctor had prescribed penicillin for him two days earlier, but the patient became unable to swallow. [8 Strange Signs You're Having an Allergic Reaction]

    The emergency-department doctor who saw the man started him on a course of intravenous benzylpenicillin (a different type than the oral penicillin) four times a day and gave him a single dose of intravenous dexamethasone, a steroid medication used to treat inflammation.

    By the next day, the patient had developed a rash over his groins and inner elbow. Assuming it was a reaction to the penicillin, the doctor changed his antibiotic to clarithromycin (which is in a different class of antibiotics).

    On the third day after being seen at the hospital, the patient's throat was much better, and he was able to swallow liquids and soft foods, but his rash had spread and become painful. At that point, the rash covered his armpits, buttocks, lower abdomen and upper thighs, and his groin showed signs of necrosis (dead tissue).

    The doctors had to determine whether the patient was having a severe drug reaction, which would get better on its own, or a dangerous infection of flesh-eating bacteria (necrotizing fasciitis), which would require immediate removal of the dead or infected tissue.

    The team started the patient on non-penicillin broad-spectrum antibiotics, which act against a range of bacteria, and took a tissue sample from his right groin. The sample tested negative for flesh-eating bacteria, so the patient was diagnosed with baboon syndrome.

    "It's not a very common condition," Bircher told LiveScience. For unknown reasons, it's more prevalent in males, and usually seen in postpubescent people.

    The patient stopped taking antibiotics, and used oral and topical steroids to treat his rash. He was discharged from the hospital 11 days after being admitted, and the rash disappeared.
    Baboon syndrome pictures Atlas Skin attachment.php?s=99750ec4db0457da515742ccdb9b0c98&attachmentid=999&d=1438452248&thumb=1

    "It's a true allergy," Bircher said. With steroid treatment, the rash usually fades within a week, but re-exposure to the drug or allergen can cause a relapse within one to two days, Bircher said.

    Baboon syndrome typically appears a few hours to two days after a person takes an antibiotic. The syndrome rarely affects small children, but cases have been reported in an 18-month-old and a 5-year-old, the researchers noted in their case report. Recovery can sometimes take up to three weeks.

    Exposure to penicillin, nickel or mercury are the most common causes of the syndrome, but it has also been linked to certain heartburn drugs, biological agents and chemotherapy.

    The term Baboon syndrome (BS) was introduced in 1984 to describe the characteristic development of diffuse bright red erythema on the gluteal and anogenital area – resembling the red rump of baboons as a particular clinical form of systemic allergic dermatitis. Additional symmetrical involvement of the upper inner thighs in a V-shaped pattern and major flexures occur frequently. Symmetrical flexural eczema in the absence of gluteal erythema would be better termed systemic allergic dermatitis, and not BS. Approximately 120 cases of BS have been reported to date. Systemic exposure to contact allergens (e.g., mercury) and systemic use of drugs usually without known prior cutaneous sensitization (e.g., amoxicillin) were the main causes. Ethical concern based on the comparison to an animal led to controversy as to whether to continue using the term or to avoid it completely. Such figurative allusions enable a first-glance diagnosis and reflect the terminological richness in dermatology. The acronym SDRIFE (symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema) was recently proposed to replace BS in systemic drug-related cases. This is a comprehensive review of the previously documented findings in BS regarding its clinical features, histopathology and pathogenesis, with special focus on the causative agents and terminology. Furthermore, a subclassification of BS is proposed regarding both the causative agent and a demonstrable previous cutaneous sensitization: contact allergen-induced BS (excluding drugs), contact allergenic drug-induced BS and non-contact allergenic drug-induced BS.
    Baboon syndrome pictures Atlas Skin attachment.php?s=99750ec4db0457da515742ccdb9b0c98&attachmentid=1001&d=1438452292&thumb=1

    There have also been cases reported of it being triggered by chemotherapy and heartburn medication.
    The 40-year-old patient’s case was reported by doctors at NHS Lothian who treated him.
    He went to hospital after his GP gave him penicillin for his tonsillitis and he found himself unable to swallow.

    +2
    Baboon syndrome was given its name because it causes a red rash on the buttocks which makes them resemble the buttocks of a baboon
    An A&E doctor put him on intravenous benzylpenicillin – a different type of antibiotic – and gave him steroids to treat the inflammation.
    Within 24 hours he developed a rash on his groin and elbow.
    Doctors thought he was suffering an allergic reaction to penicillin and so put him on a different type of antibiotic.
    Within two days his tonsillitis had improved but the rash had spread to his armpits, buttocks, stomach and thighs and had become painful.
    The rash in his groin area had become so severe that the tissue was beginning to die.
    Once it had been ascertained that he did not have a flesh eating disease, such as necrotising fasciitis, he was diagnosed with baboon syndrome.
    ‘It's not a very common condition,’ Dr Andreas Bircher from University Hospital of Basel told LiveScience.
    Dr Bircher, who was not involved in this patient’s treatment, went on to explain that the condition is most common in men.
    The Scottish man stopped taking antibiotics and his rash was treated with steroids.
    He left hospital after 11 days and his rash completely cleared up.
    Baboon syndrome usually disappears within a week when the patient is given steroid treatment.
    It usually occurs within two days of taking antibiotics and is very rare in children.
    Baboon syndrome pictures Atlas Skin attachment.php?s=99750ec4db0457da515742ccdb9b0c98&attachmentid=1000&d=1438452262

    The condition, which causes a rash to develop on the armpits, chest, groin and over the buttocks, is an unusual side effect of taking penicillin.
    It was given its name because the rash it causes on the buttocks resemble the rear of baboons, the Daily Mail reports.
    The Scottish patient, whose case was reported in the BMJ Case Reports, developed tonsillitis and was prescribed the antibiotic penicillin by his GP.
    Several days later, he developed a severe rash which led to him being diagnosed with baboon syndrome, LiveScience reports.
    The syndrome, which is technically called symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema, is usually caused by an allergic reaction to penicillin but it can also occasionally be triggered by exposure to nickel or mercury.
    There have also been cases reported of it being triggered by chemotherapy and heartburn medication.
    The 40-year-old patient’s case was reported by doctors at NHS Lothian who treated him.
    He went to hospital after his GP gave him penicillin for his tonsillitis and he found himself unable to swallow.
    An A&E doctor put him on intravenous benzylpenicillin – a different type of antibiotic – and gave him steroids to treat the inflammation.
    Within 24 hours he developed a rash on his groin and elbow.
    Doctors thought he was suffering an allergic reaction to penicillin and so put him on a different type of antibiotic.
    Within two days his tonsillitis had improved but the rash had spread to his armpits, buttocks, stomach and thighs and had become painful.
    The rash in his groin area had become so severe that the tissue was beginning to die.
    Once it had been ascertained that he did not have a flesh eating disease, such as necrotising fasciitis, he was diagnosed with baboon syndrome.
    ‘It's not a very common condition,’ Dr Andreas Bircher from University Hospital of Basel told LiveScience.
    Dr Bircher, who was not involved in this patient’s treatment, went on to explain that the condition is most common in men.
    The Scottish man stopped taking antibiotics and his rash was treated with steroids.
    He left hospital after 11 days and his rash completely cleared up.
    Baboon syndrome usually disappears within a week when the patient is given steroid treatment.
    It usually occurs within two days of taking antibiotics and is very rare in children.

    References:
    Man with tonsillitis develops 'baboon syndrome' after rare side effect of penicillin causes his buttocks to turn red
    Scottish man with tonsillitis develops 'baboon syndrome' after rare side effect of penicillin causes his buttocks to turn red | Daily Mail Online
    'Baboon Syndrome': An Unusual Complication of Antibiotics
    An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie







    Last edited by Medical Photos; 08-01-2015 at 06:05 PM.

Similar Threads

  1. Antiphospholipid syndrome pictures - Atlas of Skin Diseases
    By Medical Videos in forum Dermatology Atlas(Photos of cases)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-09-2009, 09:16 AM
  2. Skin lesions in ageing skin pictures - Atlas of Skin Diseases
    By Medical Videos in forum Dermatology Atlas(Photos of cases)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-09-2009, 09:00 AM
  3. Signs of ageing skin pictures - Atlas of Skin Diseases
    By Medical Videos in forum Dermatology Atlas(Photos of cases)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-09-2009, 08:58 AM
  4. Bazex syndrome pictures - Atlas of Skin Diseases
    By Medical Videos in forum Dermatology Atlas(Photos of cases)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-09-2009, 08:49 AM
  5. Gianotti-Crosti syndrome pictures - Atlas of Skin Diseases
    By Medical Videos in forum Dermatology Atlas(Photos of cases)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-09-2009, 08:48 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
About us
Medical Educational Site for Medical Students and Doctors Contains Free Medical Videos ,Atlases,Books,Drug Index ,Researches ,Health and Medical Technology news.
  • Privacy Policy
  • Join us
    Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.0 Copyright © 2015
  • vBulletin®
  • Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved. vBulletin Metro Theme by
  • PixelGoose Studio