Aortic regurgitation is where blood leaks back through the aortic valve. This is because the valve does not close properly. With each heartbeat, more blood than usual enters the left ventricle and so it needs to work harder. Mild regurgitation may not cause symptoms. More severe regurgitation can cause symptoms and may lead to heart failure. Medication can help to ease symptoms. Surgery to replace the valve may be needed.

The aortic valve lies between the left ventricle and the aorta. When the left ventricle relaxes, the aortic valve closes and the mitral valve opens. This allows more blood into the ventricle, ready for the next heartbeat.

Aortic regurgitation is sometimes called aortic incompetence or a leaky aortic valve. In aortic regurgitation the valve does not close properly. Therefore, blood leaks back (regurgitates) into the left ventricle from the aorta.

In some cases, aortic regurgitation occurs at the same time as aortic stenosis. (See separate leaflet called Aortic Stenosis.)


The aortic valve lies between the left ventricle and the aorta. When the left ventricle relaxes, the aortic valve closes and the mitral valve opens. This allows more blood into the ventricle, ready for the next heartbeat.

Aortic regurgitation is sometimes called aortic incompetence or a leaky aortic valve. In aortic regurgitation the valve does not close properly. Therefore, blood leaks back (regurgitates) into the left ventricle from the aorta.

In some cases, aortic regurgitation occurs at the same time as aortic stenosis. (See separate leaflet called Aortic Stenosis.)